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Explore the FARXIGA Mechanism of Action

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Learn more about the role of the kidney in glucose homeostasis and the mechanism by which FARXIGA, a glucuretic, removes glucose through SGLT2* inhibition and renal excretion.

*Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2


The Role of the Kidney IN GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS

The Role of the Kidney

IN GLUCOSE HOMEOSTASIS

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The Function of SGLT2

IN GLUCOSE REABSORPTION

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How FARXIGA® Works:

Mechanism of Action

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The Role of the Kidney in Glucose Homeostasis

  • The human kidney contributes significantly to the body’s regulation of glucose through: production, utilization, filtration, reabsorption1
  • In normal glucose-tolerant subjects, virtually all filtered glucose is reabsorbed2
  • Because the average plasma glucose concentration throughout a 24-hour period is 100 mg/dL, approximately 180 g of glucose are filtered out of the bloodstream per day1

Explore how the kidney plays a key role in glucose HOMEOSTASIS

The Function of SGLT2 in Glucose Reabsorption

  • SGLT2 is the cotransporter responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney1,2
  • SGLT2 is responsible for reabsorbing up to approximately 90% of the glucose filtered in
    the glomerulus3,†
  • Limited data suggest that subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)
    experience increased reabsorption of glucose4

Take a closer look at SGLT2 in action

For adults with type 2 diabetes, in addition to diet and exercise

How FARXIGA Works: Mechanism of Action

  • By inhibiting SGLT2, FARXIGA® (dapagliflozin), a glucuretic, removes glucose and associated calories.5,6
  • FARXIGA reduces reabsorption of filtered glucose and lowers the renal threshold for glucose,
    and thereby increases urinary glucose excretion.5
  • FARXIGA 10 mg is associated with the removal of approximately 70 g of glucose,
    or about 280 associated calories, into the urine, per day at 12 weeks of therapy.7
  • FARXIGA is not indicated for weight loss.

See how farxiga inhibits SGLT2

Loading the FARXIGA® (dapagliflozin) Mechanism of Action

The human kidney contributes significantly to the body’s regulation of glucose through1:

  • Production
  • Utilization
  • Filtration
  • Reabsorption

 

Because the average plasma glucose concentration throughout a 24-hour period is 100 mg/dL, approximately 180 g of glucose is filtered through the kidneys per day.1

 

In a pharmacodynamic study, FARXIGA 10 mg resulted in excretion of approximately 70 grams of glucose in the urine per day at Week 12. Results may vary. The recommended starting dose is 5 mg.

In subjects who are normally glucose-tolerant, virtually all filtered glucose is reabsorbed.2


The Function of SGLT2 IN GLUCOSE REABSORPTION

SGLT2 is the cotransporter responsible for the majority of glucose reabsorption in the kidney.2,5

 

SGLT2 is responsible for reabsorbing approximately 90% of the glucose filtered in the glomerulus in the S1 and S2 segments of the proximal tubule. The remaining 10% is reabsorbed by SGLT1 in the S3 segment of the proximal tubule.3,*

 

*Animal model

Limited data suggest that subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) experience increased reabsorption of glucose.4


How FARXIGA Works: MECHANISM OF ACTION

By inhibiting SGLT2, FARXIGA, a glucuretic, removes glucose and associated calories.5,6

FARXIGA reduces reabsorption of filtered glucose and lowers the renal threshold for glucose, and thereby increases urinary glucose excretion.5

FARXIGA 10 mg is associated with the removal of approximately 70 g of glucose, or about 280 associated calories into the urine, per day at 12 weeks of therapy.7

FARXIGA is not indicated for weight loss.


Prescribing FARXIGA FOR YOUR PATIENTS

Consider FARXIGA for patients who:

  • Need improvement in A1C
  • Could also benefit from weight and blood pressure reductions
  • Have sufficient renal function5,8,†

FARXIGA is not indicated for weight loss or the treatment of hypertension.

FARXIGA should not be initiated in patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2.